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Inspirational Words...
Written by Pope Francis, St. John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI about the Priesthood

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Diocese of Scranton
Vocations Office

300 Wyoming Avenue
Scranton, PA 18503-1279
Phone: 570-207-1452
Email Us

Scranton Vocations Blog

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Quo Vadis Days 2017

Date: June 25-28
Location: Misericordia University, Dallas PA
Who: 9-12th grade high school young men
Cost: $40.00

Quo Vadis Days is a camp for young Catholic men to deepen their faith, learn more about all vocations, and better discern God’s call in their lives. The camp will feature dynamic talks, prayer, games, sports, activities, music and more. Participants will have the opportunity to meet priests and seminarians from throughout the Diocese of Scranton. All participants are required to get a letter of recommendation from a priest, deacon, parish life coordinator, director of religious education, or youth minister to register.

Questions: Call 570-207-1452

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CLICK HERE to register/donate online.





Seminarian Receives Rite of Candidacy; Young Men Gather for Project Andrew Dinner


Just as Mary's "yes" gave birth to Our Lord, each one of us — if we are authentic in our resolve to follow Jesus — must consider what God is calling us to do with our lives.

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera made that point as he celebrated the Rite of Admission to Candidacy for seminarian Ryan Glenn during Evening Prayer at the Cathedral of Saint Peter on December 28. Candidacy marks a seminarian's public announcement of his intention to be ordained and the Church's acceptance of him as a candidate for Holy Orders.

The service was followed by the annual Project Andrew Dinner, at which priests, deacons, seminarians and their families, and those who are being invited to consider a potential call to Diocesan priesthood, gathered at the Diocesan Pastoral Center for conversation and fellowship.

In his homily at the Rite of Candidacy, Bishop Bambera noted that no matter where we are in the journey of life — no matter what our plans or hopes for our future might be — may we always be honest and humble enough to take care of our relationship with Jesus and listen with care to his voice.

"I'm so pleased that as we join together for this annual Project Andrew gathering — with many of you actively discerning what God is calling you to do and to be in your lives — we're privileged to join with our brother and friend, Ryan Glenn, as he takes an important step forward in his journey of faith," he said.

"Ryan, the voice of God that has spoken to your heart calls you today to make a radical decision for discipleship — a decision that challenges all of us and particularly you, as you seek a share in the sacrament of Holy Orders... on behalf of this community of God's faithful people, all of us promise to assist you with our love and prayers as you continue on this journey."

The Bishop cited Pope Francis, who beautifully articulated why this is so: "The Church needs ministers capable of warming people's hearts, of walking with them in the night, of dialoguing with their hopes and disappointments, of mending their brokenness."

Mr. Glenn said he decided to have his Candidacy during the Project Andrew Dinner to help inspire others. "I know I was inspired by Bill Beechko's candidacy this past summer, my sister's marriage ceremony, and other special events. I thought it would be great if my public commitment to live out my vocation would inspire others to move forward with God's special plan for their lives."

After the Project Andrew Dinner, Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, spoke about the Vocation Office.

"It was wonderful to see so many young men from throughout the Diocese respond to Bishop Bambera's invitation to join him, priests, deacons and seminarians for this year's Project Andrew Dinner," he said. "I encourage everyone to continue to grow as disciples of Jesus and allow the Diocesan Vocation team to support them in their discernment."

The evening concluded with the seminarians passing out calendars with opportunities for high school students, college students, and working young adults to get involved.

For more information about programs sponsored by the Diocese.





Bishop Bambera celebrates the Rite of Admission to Candidacy for Holy Orders for seminarian Ryan Glenn.


Seminarian Ryan Glenn with Bishop Bambera and his family.


Young men attending the Project Andrew Dinner had the opportunity to connect with others from throughout the Diocese of Scranton.


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#leaveamark16 Are you leaving a mark?
Gathering the Young Church of the Diocese of Scranton

"Dear young people, we didn't come into this world to 'vegetate', to take it easy, to make our lives a comfortable sofa to fall asleep on," said Pope Francis at World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland this summer. "No, we came for another reason: to leave a mark. It is very sad to pass through life without leaving a mark."

After journeying to Poland this summer with a group of young adults and hearing the messages from Pope Francis, Bishop Joseph C. Bambera is calling the young church of the Diocese of Scranton to gather in the Cathedral of Saint Peter on Sunday, November 6 for a special Mass at 5 p.m. followed by a reception in the Diocesan Pastoral Center. As the young church gathers, the question continues: are you leaving a mark?

The Diocesan Vocation Office is sponsoring this gathering specifically for high school juniors and seniors, college students and young adults through age 35. Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, is excited about this new initiative.

"Last semester, our office brought together student representatives, chaplains, and campus ministers from the four Catholic colleges and universities for an informal conversation about how to approach the vocation question with young adults today," he said. "It was clear in addition to their many recommendations that they wanted a special Mass for the young church with Bishop Bambera."

November 6 kicks off National Vocation Awareness Week. In the Diocese of Scranton, this week will focus on everyone's baptismal call to holiness and mission and the call to intentional discipleship. The young church in the Diocese is urged to leave a mark and not be 'couch potatoes' as referred by Pope Francis.

In addition to chaplains, campus ministers, and director of religious formation being involved in the planning of this event, there are also student representatives from the different schools. Mollie Burda, a junior at Holy Cross High School, is serving on one of the subcommittees for this event.

"I decided to help plan this event because I believe it is important to bring the young church together because we are not just the present church but also the future," she said. "I am looking forward to meeting and connecting with new people from throughout the Diocese and deepening my spiritual life. I am part of the promotions subcommittee which is tasked with spreading information about the event and inviting individuals to attend."

In order to best reach the target demographic, the promotions subcommittee came up with the hash tag #leaveamark16. This hash tag is now the title of the event and will be used on all promotional materials in print and online. Those attending are encouraged to take pictures before, during, and after the event and use this particular hash tag. A facebook event has been setup on the vocation office page to help communicate more details about the event.

"We hope to see students and young adults from all eleven counties of the Diocese," said Fr. Williams. "This day celebrating the young church and encouraging them to leave a mark in the world can be a transformative experience for all."

For more information about this event, please contact the Diocesan Vocation Office at 570-207-1452.


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Quo Vadis Days 2016

Date: June 26-29
Location: Misericordia University, Dallas PA
Who: 9-12th grade high school young men

The Diocesan Vocation Office once again hosted Quo Vadis Days at Misericordia University June 26-29. The camp brought together men of high school age who are committed to their Catholic faith and actively involved in the life of their parishes.

"This was our second year for Quo Vadis Days, and our numbers almost doubled from last year," said Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians. "It was a great opportunity for young people from across the Diocese of Scranton to gather, pray, and grow as disciples of Jesus."

The name Quo Vadis (Where are you going?) poses the question that every person faces as their life unfolds and they make decisions about their vocation, be it as a single or married person, or someone called to serve as a priest or religious.

Quo Vadis brought together 40 young men plus seminarians, young adult volunteers, assistant vocation directors, and priests from around the Diocese of Scranton. The camp offered participants an opportunity to reflect on and deepen their faith, learn more about all vocations, and better discern God's call in their lives through dynamic talks, games, prayer, sports, activities, music, liturgy and much more.

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera visited on the first day and presided at evening prayer. He shared the story of his own call to priesthood and offered insights into the life and ministry of a diocesan priest. Participants were then able to spend time with the Bishop at dinner.

Seminarians and young adult volunteers helped lead small group discussions with participants after each of the sessions and talks. John Gower, one of the speakers as well as a young adult volunteer, enjoyed the opportunity to lead a group of students from around the diocese.

"As a small group leader, it was wonderful to watch the participant's excitement for their faith grow as the retreat went one," he said. "I was truly blessed to be able to share my personal experience of growing in faith throughout high school and my first year of college with the guys."

This was the first time most of the participants attended Quo Vadis Days. However, there were some who attended last. Scott Williams, a junior at Holy Redeemer High School and a parishioner of Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Parish in Tunkhannock, enjoyed the experience once again this year.

"This was my second year attending Quo Vadis Days, and it was definitely a retreat like no other I have attended," he said. "You have time for prayer and discernment, and plenty of time for fun and games. It was a great opportunity to get to know our diocesan priests and the seminarians."

In an order to keep everyone connected and grow the numbers, follow-up gatherings will be held at different locations throughout the Diocese.

"We are looking forward to our gatherings throughout the year," said Father Don Williams. "Each of the participants are encouraged to invite a friend or friends. Before you know it, it'll be time for our vocation camp once again next June."

For more information about the Quo Vadis program, please call 570-207-1452.






Group photo at Quo Vadis Days


Bishop Joseph C. Bambera lead evening prayer and shared his vocation story with participants


John Gower, a young adult volunteer, gives the first talk at Quo Vadis Days


Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, leads participants in a discussion.


Ropes Course


Bonfire and S’mores



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Two Priests Ordained for the Diocese of Scranton

The Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton, ordained Reverend Michael S. Drevitch and Reverend Joseph J. Mosley to the priesthood for the Diocese of Scranton on Saturday, May 28, 2016 in the Cathedral of Saint Peter, Scranton. Father Drevitch is from Corpus Christi Parish, West Pittston and Father Mosley is from Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary Parish, Jermyn.

Bishop Bambera's Homily | Prayer Vigil Facebook Album | Ordination Facebook Album


Witness some of the special event below:



Principals participating in the Mass of Ordination included, from left: Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, V.G., Vicar General of the Diocese; Reverend Jeffrey J. Walsh, V.E., Episcopal Vicar for Clergy; Bishop Emeritus James C. Timlin; Reverend Joseph J. Mosley; the Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton; Reverend Michael S. Drevitch; Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus John M. Dougherty; Reverend Scott Detisch, representing St. Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore, Maryland; Reverend Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians.



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World Day of Prayer for Vocations

April 17 marks the 53rd Anniversary of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations. The Diocese of Scranton will observe this occasion with a two-part celebration.

On Sunday, May 1, at 7:00 p.m. in the Church of St. Matthew, East Stroudsburg, Bishop Joseph C. Bambera, will be the principal celebrant and homilist for a Mass in honor of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations.

All are welcome to participate in this celebration, with a particular intention to gather parents, young people, potential candidates for the priesthood and religious life, clergy, religious, catechists, youth ministers, Catholic school teachers, college/university campus ministers and all who are interested in supporting vocation ministry.

On Sunday, April 17, parishes are encouraged to observe the World Day of Prayer for Vocations with local celebrations. St. Joseph the Worker Parish, Williamsport, will celebrate a special Mass at 5 p.m.

Pope Francis issued a Papal Message for the occasion, in conjunction with the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. In it, he reminds us, "the Christian vocation, just like every other particular vocation, is born from within the People of God, and is a gift of divine mercy. The ecclesial dynamism of an individual's vocation demands that we go beyond ourselves and place our lives at the service of God's plan."

For more information, please call the Diocesan Vocations Office (570) 207-1452 or email vocations@dioceseofscranton.org.


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'Come and See' Weekend

Our annual 'Come and See' weekend retreat was held at the end of February at the Villa of Our Lady Retreat House in Mount Pocono. The retreat enabled participants to pray, talk with seminarians and Diocesan priests, and listen to presentations on discernment and seminary life. Bishop Bambera joined the group for evening prayer and dinner one of the nights.

Below are some reflections from those who participated in the weekend:

"The 'Come and See' weekend was great. I enjoyed the spiritual exercises and the time away from everything. It was a good opportunity to get to know our priests and seminarians better, and get a glimpse of what it's like to be in their shoes. I got a new appreciation for the priestly vocation; what they do is really heroic. They gave good advice for men discerning the vocation, and I thought the environment was very comfortable and supportive. I'd recommend it to any young man who's serious about his faith."

Adam T., Mountain Top


"The time spent at the retreat was very special for me and the other guys that were there. It was an awesome opportunity to pray, reflect, and challenge ourselves to respond to God's persistent call in our lives. Some of us are more certain with our call while others are not, but the retreat experience allows us to seek for the answers we are looking for in life. The community and fellowship really helps one discern God's will and how we can respond with love."

Michael B., Wilkes-Barre


"During this year's 'Come and See' weekend, I most appreciated being able to talk and socialize with a number of young men from throughout the Diocese of Scranton who are taking seriously the call to Christian discipleship. In various ways, these men have been asking how they can respond in love to the call of the Lord to follow Him. The possibility of serving the Church of Scranton as a priest has entered into the hearts of these men. They came to this retreat weekend with a desire to continue to discern the will of God and to listen attentively to the stirrings of the Spirit."

Ryan Glenn, seminarian




For more information about programs/retreats sponsored by the Vocation Office, please call (570) 207-1452.


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Project Andrew Dinner 2015


The annual Project Andrew Dinner hosted by Bishop Bambera was held after Christmas in the Diocesan Pastoral Center. Priests, deacons, seminarians, and those who are being invited to consider a potential call to Diocesan Priesthood from throughout the Diocese of Scranton were in attendance.

The evening began with a social in the lobby of the pastoral center. All were invited to mingle and connect while enjoying some appetizers and snacks. Bishop Bambera then welcomed everyone and blessed the meal.

After dinner, Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, spoke on behalf of God and the people of God. He encouraged everyone to stay open to whatever God has in store for their lives. High school students are encouraged to stay involved in their schools and parishes. In addition, he would like to see them become involved in Quo Vadis, ISLI (International Student Leadership Institute), and attend the March for Life. College students and young adults are encouraged to continue being involved in the life of the church. In addition, he would like to see them attend the March for Life, the Vocation weekend retreat in February, and the World Youth Day pilgrimage to Poland in July.

The night concluded with prayer service in the Cathedral of Saint Peter. Bishop Bambera led everyone in prayer and reflection. Nicholas Jennings and Charles Rennekamp, two current seminarians, led everyone in song.

For more information about the Vocation Office, please call 570-207-1452.






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Fall Update: Vocation Office


The Vocation Office has been a busy place throughout the fall. Adding a new staff member, attending multiple conferences, and running many different programs and discernment groups made September turn into December in a blink of an eye.

Dominick Costantino Jr. was added to the vocation team as the Vocation Program Coordinator. His primary responsibilities are to manage the communications platform for the office as well as help coordinate programming and events. He is a graduate of Wilkes University with a bachelor's degree in Communication Studies. He serves as Director of Music Ministry and Youth Ministry at Exaltation of the Holy Cross Parish in Hanover Township.

Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, and Dominick attended multiple workshops and conferences throughout the fall. The first was a seminar titled "Forming Intentional Disciples" by Sherry A. Weddell at Saint Monica Parish in West Wyoming. The second was a Hispanic workshop sponsored by the National Conference of Diocesan Vocation Directors (NCDVD) at the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Huntington, New York. The third was the Pennsylvania Catholic Campus Ministry Association Conference in Malvern, Pennsylvania. The last was the National Catholic Youth Conference (NCYC) in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Since the start of the Quo Vadis camp in June, there have been a few follow up gatherings to keep members engaged and also to attract new members. One gathering was held at Misericordia University to watch the Papal Mass in Philadelphia. The other gatherings were held at Gate of Heaven Parish in Dallas. The gatherings typically include prayer, Eucharistic adoration, faith sharing, sports, team building activities, and food.

Discernment groups are meeting at Holy Redeemer High School in Wilkes-Barre and Holy Cross High School in Dunmore after the faculty and students participated in the Called-by-Name program. The Williamsport area started Eucharistic Adoration for vocations every weekday, and Epiphany Parish in Sayre adopted our current seminarians during National Vocation Awareness Week. There have also been special vocation talks and masses at our Catholic schools as well as local colleges and universities.

We encourage anyone thinking about the possibility of priesthood to talk to their Pastor or contact the Vocation Office. High school students are encouraged to participate in March for Life in January, International Student Leadership Institute (ISLI) in February, and other Diocesan sponsored youth events.



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Summer Gathering for Seminarians
Time to reflect and relax

The annual summer gathering for Diocesan seminarians was held recently at the Jesuit Retreat Center at Chapman Lake in Scott Township.

It brought together our 10 current seminarians, including three new men who are beginning their formation for the priesthood this year. Over the course of three days, the men were able to pray together, have conversation and enjoy some relaxation after a busy summer.

In addition to Eucharistic liturgy and adoration, the seminarians heard about each other's formation experiences and spiritual growth; learned how the Diocese is implementing Bishop Bambera's pastoral vision; listened to presentations on wellness, healthy lifestyle management, and safe environments. The group also visited St. Joseph's Center, the ministry of the IHM Sisters that serves individuals and families with special needs.

During the course of the gathering, parents and family members of the seminarians, and several young men who are discerning God's plan for their lives, were invited for evening prayer, a barbeque and a reflection by Bishop Bambera.

The summer gathering concluded with evening prayer and dinner with the seminarians' home pastors at the Diocesan Pastoral Center.


Facebook Album


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Diocese hosts Quo Vadis Days for young men
Where are you going?

The Diocese of Scranton's inaugural Quo Vadis Days brought together men of high school age who are committed to their Catholic faith and actively involved in the life of their parishes.

The name Quo Vadis (Where are you going?) poses the question that every person faces as their life unfolds and they make decisions about their vocation, be it as a single or married person, or someone called to serve as a priest or religious.

For the 25 young men who gathered at Misericordia University in Dallas June 28 to July 1, the Quo Vadis camp offered an opportunity to reflect on and deepen their faith, learn more about all vocations, and better discern God's call in their lives.

Quo Vadis Days featured talks, prayer, games, sports activities, music and liturgy. The participants were able to meet priests and seminarians of the Diocese.

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera visited, participated in a Holy Hour, shared the story of his own call to priesthood, offered insights into the life and ministry of a diocesan priest today, and he personally invited the young men to prayerfully consider what God is asking of them. If it is to serve the Church as a priest, the Bishop offered his support and the assistance of all those who are involved in vocations ministry in the Diocese.

"I think these young men really appreciated the opportunity to meet and spend time with Bishop Bambera, to talk to each other and to meet some of our seminarians and priests who were able to be with us," said Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians. "It was a blessed and fruitful experience for all of us."


Facebook Album




Reverend Seth D. Wasnock Ordained a Priest for the Diocese of Scranton

The Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton, ordained Reverend Seth D. Wasnock to the priesthood for the Diocese of Scranton on Saturday, June 6, 2015 in the Cathedral of Saint Peter, Scranton. Father Wasnock is from Forest City, where he is a member of Ascension Parish.

Bishop Bambera's Homily | Facebook Album



Principals participating in the Mass of Ordination included, from left: Reverend Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians; Reverend Kenneth D. Brighenti, Mount Saint Mary's Seminary, Md.; Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, V.G., Vicar General of the Diocese; Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus John M. Dougherty; Reverend Seth D. Wasnock; Bishop Joseph C. Bambera; Bishop Emeritus James C. Timlin; Reverend Jeffrey J. Walsh, V.E., Episcopal Vicar for Clergy; Monsignor David Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation.



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Bishop Bambera to Ordain Reverend Mr. Seth Wasnock to Priesthood June 6

Reverend Mr. Seth Dominic Wasnock, 29, of Forest City, will be ordained to the priesthood for the Diocese of Scranton this Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 10 a.m. in the Cathedral of Saint Peter, Scranton.

The Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton, will serve as principal celebrant and ordaining prelate for the morning ceremony, during which he will confer the Sacrament of Holy Orders on the ordinand.

Principal concelebrants for the Mass of Ordination will include Bishop Emeritus James C. Timlin, Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus John M. Dougherty, Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, V.G., Vicar General of the Diocese; Monsignor David Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation; Father Jeffrey J. Walsh, V.E., Episcopal Vicar for Clergy; and Father Kenneth D. Brighenti, Ph.D., of Mount Saint Mary's Seminary, Emmitsburg, Md., where Reverend Mr. Wasnock completed his preparatory formation for the priesthood.

Serving as vesting priest will be Father John C. Lambert, V.E., Episcopal Vicar, Eastern Pastoral Region of the Diocese. Father Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, will serve as assisting priest.

Masters of ceremonies will include Father Shane L. Kirby, V.E., Chancellor of the Diocese; Monsignor Dale R. Rupert, pastor of Saint Peter's Cathedral; Father Brian J.T. Clarke, Master of Ceremonies for the Diocesan Bishop; and Father Gregory W. Kelly, pastor of Saint Patrick Parish, Milford.

All are invited to participate in this solemn Mass, and encouraged to pray for Deacon Seth Wasnock as he prepares for his ordination and begins his ministry.

CTV: Catholic Television will broadcast the Mass live and will air a rebroadcast on Tuesday, June 9, at 8 p.m.



Native Son of Ascension Parish, Forest City



Born on December 6, 1985, Seth D. Wasnock is the son of Edmund Wasnock and Pamela Franceski Green. He resides in Forest City, where he is a member of Ascension Parish.

The priest-candidate received his early education in Forest City public schools and graduated from Forest City Regional High School. Following graduation, he began preparatory studies for the priesthood for the Scranton Diocese at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Overbrook, just outside of Philadelphia.

After completing two years of college studies in the pre-theology program at Saint Charles Seminary, he enrolled at the University of Scranton, where he earned his bachelor of science degree in accounting.

Reverend Mr. Wasnock returned to pursue his priestly studies for the Diocese as a seminarian at Mount Saint Mary's Seminary in Emmitsburg, Md., where after four years he completed his theological training and received his master of divinity degree.


The newly ordained Father Wasnock will serve as principal celebrant for a Mass of Thanksgiving at his home Parish of the Ascension in Saint Joseph Church, Forest City, on Sunday, June 7, at 3 p.m.

Concelebrating the Eucharistic liturgy will be several priests of the Scranton Diocese and other priest-friends of the newly ordained. Father Brian J.T. Clarke will serve as homilist.



Reflecting on the call to Priesthood

As he prepares for his ordination to the priesthood for the Diocese of Scranton, Reverend Mr. Wasnock was asked for his thoughts on his vocation, priestly ministry, and how others might consider God's plan for their lives.

1) Discuss your calling to the priesthood – when you first considered a priestly vocation; how you experienced "God's call" any particular persons, places or events in your life that inspired/nurtured your vocation to the priesthood.

I began thinking about a possible vocation to the priesthood when I was in high school, probably when I was 16 or 17 years old. One of the biggest and best influences was our parish pastor at the time, Father Pat Albert. I remember him taking me to a vespers service one time and I got a chance to meet and talk with some seminarians. Our parish was very active and I spent a lot of time there in church and was involved in all facets of parish life. I believe at that time the seed to a priestly vocation was planted and the door was open for me. I originally entered the seminary right after I graduated from high school and spent two years at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia and then returned home to attend the University of Scranton. I remained active in my home parish and I also had the great influence of the Jesuit priests at the University. I stayed close to my church and attended Mass regularly. After graduating from Scranton in 2009, I re-entered the seminary to pursue my vocation to the Diocesan priesthood.

2) What are you most looking forward to in your priestly ministry?

I believe that the priesthood is really about being there for the people. Administering the sacraments to them, especially in celebrating Mass and the Sacrament of Reconciliation. I look forward to being a part of people's lives, being there for them in all circumstances and bringing Jesus to them in their happiest moments and their saddest, too.

3) What is your vision of the Catholic priesthood?

As a priest, I know I will continue to grow in my faith, getting to know and trust in Jesus more and more, and falling in love with Him more. I hope and pray to be a living example to the people that our religion today is not an old and sterile religion. It is alive and I want to make religion and Jesus relevant in their lives.

4) What would you say to a man who feels called to the priesthood and is hesitant about taking the next step?

My best advice would be something I believe was the best advice given to me during my discernment process and that, initially, you are not really called to the priesthood. You are called to open yourself up to the possibility of a priestly vocation. By developing a solid prayer life you will be able to discern better and consider more fully that God may be calling you to be a priest. You are being called just to make that next step, which may be considering the possibility of entering a seminary. Look at a vocation as a day-to-day process; don't look all the way down to the end of the road. Be open, trust, pray and get to know Jesus better. In the end, you becoming a priest is ultimately up to God. Don't be overwhelmed. Take the time that is needed to realize if this is what God is calling you to do.


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Diocese of Scranton Vocations Golf Classic 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015



Among the committee members planning the event are, seated from left, Marilouise Ruane, Director of Stewardship; Father Donald Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Director of Seminarians, chair; Mark Soprano, and Karen Clifford. Standing are Chris DiMattio, Kathy Oven, Father David Cappelloni, Father Joseph Evanko, Attorney Joseph O'Brien, Dominic Rinaldi and Monsignor David Bohr. The committee also includes Jim Bebla, Diocesan Secretary for Development, John Callahan, Thomas Considine, Father Paul Fontanella, Frank Hine, John Kearney, Monsignor David McAndrews, Thomas Medico, Frank Orlando, Roseann Tedesco and Father Jeffrey Walsh.


General Information:

Registration: 10:00 a.m.
Lunch: 11:00 a.m.
Shotgun Start: 12:00 Noon


This tournament will support the Saint John Vianney Vocations Endowment Fund. This fund accepts permanently restricted donations. Proceeds from the endowment enable the Diocese of Scranton to continue to prepare men to become priests who will care for the next generation of faithful in our parishes.

His Excellency Bishop Joseph C. Bambera will serve as honorary chairman and be with us again this year.

Sponsorships:

Archangel: $2,500
  • Cart & Green Fees for Four Golfers
  • Lunch, Dinner, Cocktail Reception
  • Hole Signage
  • Program Recognition
  • Listing in The Catholic Light
  • Entitled to distribute company give-away at Registration Table
  • Ticket for Additional Guest at the Tournament Dinner
Angel: $1,250
  • Cart & Green Fees for Four Golfers
  • Lunch, Dinner, Cocktail Reception
  • Hole Signage
  • Recognition in Program and The Catholic Light
Benefactor: $500
  • Recognition in Program and The Catholic Light
Flag Sponsor Sign: $250
  • Recognition in Program and The Catholic Light
Individual Golfer: $250
  • Cart & Green Fees for One
  • Lunch, Dinner, Cocktail Reception
Hole Sponsor: $100


Deadline for Program Sponsorship is July 6, 2015.
* Field limited to the first 176 golfers.

Tournament Location:
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
260 Country Club Drive
Mountain Top, PA 18707


For more information or to register:
Download the 2015 Golf Classic Brochure


570-207-2250
Development@DioceseofScranton.org





Bishop Bambera with Father Don Williams and seminarians at the event in 2014.


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Two Seminarians Ordained as Transitional Deacons
Entering final year of formation for priesthood

Michael S. Drevitch and Joseph J. Mosley began their final step of formation for the priesthood for the Diocese of Scranton when they were ordained to the transitional diaconate by Bishop Joseph C. Bambera at a Mass on Saturday, May 23, 2015 in the Cathedral of Saint Peter in Scranton. Ordination as a transitional deacon generally occurs after a seminarian has completed at least three years of graduate study in theology and takes place usually one year prior to priestly ordination. A deacon is an ordinary minister of Baptism, and is able to preside at weddings, assist the priest at Mass, proclaim the Gospel and preach, as well as preside at wakes and funeral services.

Reverend Mr. Mosley is from Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary Parish in Jermyn. Reverend Mr. Drevitch is a native son of St. André Bessette Parish in Wilkes-Barre, and a member of Corpus Christi Parish in West Pittston. Both are studying at St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore.

The ordination of Reverend Mr. Drevitch and Reverend Mr. Mosley to the priesthood is expected in June of 2016.



Pictured from left are: Reverend Edward J. Griswold, Rector of Saint Mary's Seminary and University, Baltimore; Reverend Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians; Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, V.G., Vicar General of the Diocese; Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus John M. Dougherty; Reverend Mr. Joseph J. Mosley; Bishop Joseph C. Bambera; Reverend Mr. Michael S. Drevitch; Bishop Emeritus James C. Timlin; Monsignor David A. Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation; Reverend Jeffrey J. Walsh, V.E., Episcopal Vicar for Clergy.


Bishop Bambera's Homily | Mass Video | Facebook Album



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Everyone Called to Promote a Culture of Vocations
Pray – Affirm – Encourage – Invite

By virtue of our baptism, all of us are called and gifted for mission as disciples of Christ.

The recent observance of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations gave us the opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to this essential mission.

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera was principal celebrant of the Mass at the Cathedral of Saint Peter in Scranton on April 26, 2015. The homilist was Father Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians.

Father Williams noted that each one of us has a vocation - to be married, single or in some cases to serve in ordained ministry or in consecrated life. Those who may be called to the priesthood or religious life need our encouragement and support as they discern God's plan for them.

Everyone has a role to play in this plan. When we identify a young person who has the gifts to serve the Church as a priest or religious, we are asked to affirm them and invite them to consider their vocation and support them on the journey.

Current priests, religious sisters, deacons, teachers, family and friends can make all the difference in helping an individual recognize how they can cooperate with God's will.


See the full article and pictures from World Wasnock Ordained for Vocations here.



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Graced Moments in The Villas

The following reflection was written by Charles Rennekamp and Robert Dogal, seminarians for the Diocese of Scranton, upon returning from their mission experience to Pope Francis' hometown in Argentina.




This past February during our spring break, we had the opportunity to travel to Buenos Aires, Argentina, to follow in the footsteps of Pope Francis. Challenged by Pope Francis' call for us to be missionary disciples, we traveled with our seminarian brothers from New York to meet the poor and forgotten in the Pope's hometown. During our trip, we visited the poor neighborhoods, called "villas," where many of the city's immigrants and marginalized peoples live.

We spent a few days at "Virgen Inmaculada" parish located in one of the numerous villas of Buenos Aires, where we worked alongside Father Pedro and Father Gaston, who staff the parish. These two priests made us feel welcome in their community beginning with the first Mass we attended until our difficult goodbye after the final Mass more than a week later. The people at this parish shared with us their profound sense of community. We especially experienced this during the sign of peace each day at Mass. Each member of the community embraced us as one of their own.

With our limited knowledge of Spanish, we were afraid that the language barrier would make communication difficult between us and the residents of the villas. However, we found a common means of communication through the Mass and sports. Though the Mass was in a different language, it was the same Mass. Soccer was another way we were all able to bond, laugh, and understand one another without needing words. We also came together as a community during the celebration of daily Mass, where we were seated next to recovering drug addicts, widows, orphans, and those struggling to provide for their families. Although most of these people are forgotten by mainstream Argentinean society, they are the backbone of the parish community with which we worked.

Like the signs of peace exchanged at Mass, the peoples of the villas also freely shared their stories with us. One day we visited a drug rehab center run through the parish. There we met men and women, young and old, who described the struggle of finding meaning and purpose in their lives. These individuals struggled to see a future for themselves, as most lacked adequate educational opportunities. Many turned to destructive means, including drugs and alcohol, in their pursuit of happiness. However, these substances never brought true happiness or fulfillment.

The damaging force of addiction is not just an issue isolated to the villas of Buenos Aires. Within our own families and communities, we, too, know people who are struggling with addictions. Without judging them, we must find them, let them know they are loved, and offer them the help they need. As we heard their testimonies we could not help but thank God that these individuals struggling with addiction have since turned to the Lord. They have come to take up their own crosses of addiction and now carry them with Christ. They have found new meaning in their lives through the door that was opened to them by the Church.

There were many other graced moments during our trip in Argentina. One day at Mass, we met a middle-aged woman whose husband had recently died. You could see the pain in her eyes; the anguish of this loss was still fresh in her mind. In the middle of the liturgy, this woman was brought to tears. Immediately, the people around her began to console this woman by hugging and holding onto her. The woman stayed for the rest of Mass. Afterwards, she asked the priest for a special blessing before going home. It was a beautiful moment.

This woman proved to be a great example for us of somebody who is strong and passionate, even in the midst of pain and tears. She trusted God's plan, even though she struggled to understand it. Likewise, the Christian community that surrounded this woman in her grief was a powerful witness for us. The love expressed by the Body of Christ that day at Mass was truly palpable.

Throughout the trip, the people displayed a great love and faith which left us — as missionaries — having received much more than we gave. As Christians, we are missionaries who bring Christ wherever we go, but we must also expect to find Christ already there. The beauty in this is seeing and knowing that the Catholic Church is truly alive. The light of Christ can also be seen in our Holy Father Pope Francis. We pray that the joy of the Gospel, which we encountered in a profound way in the Church and people of Buenos Aires, may guide Catholics everywhere.






This trip to Argentina has strengthened our desire to live out our Christian vocation as missionary disciples. We challenge you to follow us in our call to missionary discipleship. We do not need to travel to a far-away land to do this. Instead, all we need to do is go and find our neighbors in need and share with them the love of Christ. Pope Francis has said, "All of us, each day, are presented with the option of being a Good Samaritans or an indifferent passerby." Let us now go and be Christ for others!


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Three Seminarians Receive Ministries

On March 14, 2015 at St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore, three Diocese of Scranton seminarians – Bill Beechko, Ryan Glenn, and Shawn Simchock – received the Ministry of Lector, and Ryan also received the Ministry of Acolyte. Bishop Denis Madden, Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore, presided. The church emphasizes the stages of the journey to Holy Orders through these ministries. Following the ceremony, family and friends joined the seminarians for a reception.

Bill is from SS. Anthony and Rocco Parish, Dunmore; Ryan is from St. Jude's Parish, Mountain Top; and Shawn is from Queen of Heaven Parish, Hazleton. Please keep them in prayer as they continue in their formation for Diocesan Priesthood!

The Ministry of Lector calls men to be servants of the Living Word of God. In proclaiming the readings at liturgy, the reader does more than simply read. Those who exercise the ministry of lector must be truly suited and carefully prepared, so that the faithful may develop a warm and living love for Sacred Scripture from listening to the sacred readings.

Acolytes are appointed to aid the deacon and to minister to the priest. It is his duty to attend to the service of the altar and to assist the deacon and the priest in liturgical celebrations, especially in the celebration of Mass. He may also distribute communion as an extraordinary minister of Holy Communion when appropriate.




Front row: Rev. Thomas R. Hurst, P.S.S., S.T.L., Ph.D., President-Rector and Vice Chancellor of St. Mary's Seminary; Most Rev. Denis Madden, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Baltimore; seminarian Ryan Glenn; Rev. Don Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations.
Back Row: seminarians Michael Drevitch, William Beechko II, Joseph Mosley, and Shawn Simchock.





Ryan Glenn and Shawn Simchock as they are receiving Ministry of Lector.
Bill Beechko as he is receiving the
Ministry of Lector.



Ryan Glenn with his family and parents, Maria and James.



Michael Drevitch with his mother Linda and family members and friends.



Following the ceremony, family and friends joined the seminarians for a reception.



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2015 March for Life

Bishop Joseph Bambera, Monsignor Thomas Muldowney, Vicar General, and Diocese of Scranton seminarians recently attended the 2015 March for Life in Washington DC.


Pictured left to right: Ryan Glenn, Shawn Simchock, Michael Drevitch, Joseph Mosley, Bishop Joseph Bambera, William Beechko, and Monsignor Thomas Muldowney, V.G.


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Bishop Bambera with Scranton Seminarians

Bishop Joseph Bambera gathers with some of the Diocese of Scranton seminarians this Christmas. He also welcomed new seminarian Jonathan Kuhar, who was recently accepted into the formation program for the Diocese and is slated to begin seminary formation in the fall of 2015.


Pictured left to right are: Msgr. David Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation, Robert Dogal, Charles Rennekamp, Ryan Glenn, Jonathan Kuhar, Bishop Joseph Bambera, Joseph Mosley, Rev. Donald Williams, Diocesan Director of Seminarians and Vocation Director, Shawn Simchock, Lucas Yavorosky, and William Beechko.

Unable to attend the gathering that day were seminarians Michael Drevitch and Rev. Mr. Seth Wasnock.


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National Vocation Awareness Week (NVAW)

NVAW is an annual week-long celebration of the Catholic Church in the United States dedicated to promote vocations to the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life through prayer and education, and to renew our prayers and support for those who are considering one of these particular vocations. NVAW began in 1976. Beginning in 2014 NVAW was moved from the week coinciding with the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord to the first full week of November, which follows the Feast of All Saints.


POPE FRANCIS' PRAYER FOR VOCATIONS

God our Father,
You made each of us to use
our gifts in the Body of Christ.
We ask that you inspire
young people whom you call
to priesthood and consecrated life to
courageously follow your will.
Send workers into your great
harvest so that the Gospel is
preached, the poor are served with
love, the suffering are comforted,
and your people are strengthened
by the sacraments.
Through Christ our Lord.
Amen.


Catholic School Faculty, Catechists and Youth Ministers:
  • The Bishop's Conference has lesson plans that can be used in the religious education classes and youth ministry experiences of your parish or school during NVAW, November 2-9, 2014. www.usccb.org/vocations

  • The Vocation Office of the Congregation of Holy Cross has put together a vocation curriculum with the help of ACE-Notre Dame's post-grad teaching program. www.vocation.nd.edu/get-connected/vocations-curriculum


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Resolve with joy
Two Diocese of Scranton Seminarians Receive Rite of Candidacy



Two Diocese of Scranton seminarians took the next step in their formation for the priesthood when they received the Rite of Admission to Candidacy.

The Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton, conferred the rite on Michael S. Drevitch and Joseph J. Mosley during a Mass at the Cathedral of Saint Peter in Scranton last Saturday,
August 9.


The Bishop, in his homily, noted that admission to candidacy marks in a formal way the Church's judgment that the person's vocation is authentic and that he possesses the qualities necessary for the ordained ministry. "With this formal recognition of your candidacy, you enter into a new and deeper phase of formation to prepare you for the singular seal of the Holy Spirit in the Sacrament of Holy Orders."



Seminarians Michael S. Drevitch and Joseph J. Mosley receive the Rite of Admission to Candidacy from Bishop Bambera at a Mass last Saturday at the Cathedral of Saint Peter in Scranton. Candidacy marks in a formal way the Church's judgment that the person's vocation is authentic and that he possesses the qualities necessary for the ordained ministry.


After the two candidates were presented by Father Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians, Bishop Bambera posed two questions:
  • In response to the Lord's call, do you resolve to complete your preparation so that in due time through Holy Orders you will be prepared to assume ministry within the Church?

  • Do you resolve to prepare yourselves in mind and spirit to give faithful service to Christ the Lord and his Body, the Church?

Both candidates answered in the affirmative, and then the Bishop proclaimed that "The Church accepts your resolve with joy. May God who has begun the good work in you bring it to fulfillment."

Both seminarians are in formation for the priesthood at Saint Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore. They will be ordained as transitional deacons in May of 2015. Mr. Drevitch is a native son of Saint André Bessette Parish in Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Mosley's home parish is Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary in Jermyn.



Linda Drevitch (left) and Diane Mosley, mothers of the candidates,
present offertory gifts to Bishop Bambera.


Bishop Bambera's homily reflected on Matthew's gospel story about Peter leaving the boat to walk across the water to Jesus, but then, lacking faith he begins to sink – as if he is exhibiting that he doesn't have what it takes to accept what the Lord is calling him to do.

And we also begin to sink as well, the Bishop suggested, when we use false humility to duck God's call to holiness and when we put God off by saying we're not worthy. "Go bother someone else."

"But we must also grasp the underlying hope the gospel gives," Bishop Bambera said. "That hope is found in the two final lines we need to take home with us today – the very point and climax of the gospel story. ‘Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.' Jesus stretched out his hand to catch Peter. And he stretches out his hand to catch me and you.

"And so, with this great challenge for discipleship that is presented to all of us by the Lord Jesus in today's gospel – and with the hope and encouragement that Jesus provides for all of us who want to be close to him – we now turn to our brothers Joseph and Michael.

"Joseph and Michael, you are being asked to make a radical decision today – a decision framed by the Word of God that challenges all of us and particularly you, as you seek a share in the sacrament of Holy Orders. You are being given the opportunity to deepen your resolve to follow the Lord Jesus and to serve the People of God. Just like Peter and the first disciples, you have been chosen for this role. The Church has understood this to mean that no one enters into ordained service who has not been called, chosen and sent. The ordained ministry is not like a career which one self-selects, but a divine vocation and grace to which one strives to be faithful. Believe that with all of your heart."

Bishop Bambera reminded the candidates that their openness to the call to serve the Church demands that they come to know well that they cannot succeed in this way of life apart from the grace of God. "Your openness to the call to serve the Church also demands a continual letting go of your own ego, needs, interests and control in order to imitate Jesus – who washed the feet of his friends in humble service of their needs and then commands all who hear his words, ‘As I have done, so you must do.'"

The Bishop also recalled Pope Francis' words: "Authentic power is found in service." He urged the candidates to treasure those words and "make them your own."

The Bishop noted that each of us is called to live our lives with singular focus upon Jesus. While an incredible challenge, it is the only way in which we will find our peace.

"Joseph and Michael, on behalf of this community of God's faithful people, all of us promise to assist you with our love and prayers as you continue on this journey," he said. "Pope Francis beautifully articulated why this is so, 'The Church needs ministers capable of warming people's hearts, of walking with them in the night, of dialoguing with their hopes and disappointments, of mending their brokenness.'"



The candidates process out of the Cathedral after the Mass.

Pictured after the Mass, from left: Monsignor David Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation; Joseph J. Mosley; the Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton; Michael S. Drevitch; Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, Vicar General of the Diocese; Reverend Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians.


Bishop's Homily | Mass Video


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Two Seminarians To Receive Rite of Candidacy Saturday, August 9

Michael S. Drevitch Joseph J. Mosley


Two seminarians of the Diocese of Scranton will receive the Rite of Candidacy during a Mass at the Cathedral of Saint Peter in Scranton on Saturday, August 9, at 4 p.m.

The candidates are Michael S. Drevitch and Joseph J. Mosley. Both are in formation for the priesthood at Saint Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore. Mr. Drevitch is a native son of Saint André Bessette Parish in Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Mosley's home parish is Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary in Jermyn.

Candidacy is the declaration of intent to continue preparation to receive Holy Orders. Through this ritual, the Church receives the commitment and prays that the man may persevere in his vocation.

Mr. Drevitch and Mr. Mosley will be ordained as transitional deacons in May of 2015.

All are welcome to participate in the Mass on August 9. CTV: Catholic Television of the Diocese of Scranton, will air a live broadcast of the liturgy.

For information on vocations, please visit this website or the Facebook page.


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Lending a Hand at the St. Joseph's Center Summer Festival



Several Diocesan seminarians, priests and Bishop Joseph C. Bambera lent a hand in the pizza booth at the 53rd Annual St. Joseph's Center Summer Festival held at Marywood University. From left: Father Jeffrey J. Walsh, pastor of St. John in East Stroudsburg and an assistant vocation director; seminarians Joe Mosley, Ryan Glenn and Rob Dogal; Bishop Bambera; Father Brian J.T. Clarke, chaplain, Holy Cross High School, Dunmore and Master of Ceremonies for the Diocesan Bishop; seminarian Michael Drevitch; Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, Vicar General of the Diocese; and Father Donald J. Williams, Director of Vocations and Director of Seminarians.


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'What a blessing this day is for all of us'
Bishop Bambera Ordains Seth D. Wasnock a Transitional Deacon



Bishop Bambera lays his hands on the head of the candidate,
ordaining him as a transitional deacon


Seth D. Wasnock, a seminarian of the Diocese of Scranton, began the final step of his formation for the priesthood when he was ordained to the transitional diaconate by the Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton, on Saturday, May 24, at a Mass celebrated at the seminarian's home parish, Ascension Parish, in St. Joseph's Church, Forest City. Diocesan clergy, fellow seminarians, family, friends, and members of the parish community participated in this joyous celebration.

Ordination as a transitional deacon generally occurs after a seminarian has completed at least three years of study in theology and takes place usually one year prior to priestly ordination. As a deacon, he will be an ordinary minister of Baptism, and will be able to preside at weddings, assist the priest at Mass, proclaim the Gospel and preach, as well as preside at wakes and funeral services.

Rev. Mr. Wasnock's ordination to the priesthood is expected in June of 2015.




The elect lies prostrate on the floor in a gesture of solemn petition while the assembly sings a litany of supplication to the saints, asking their intercession for God's blessing on the candidate to be ordained.

Rev. Mr. Wasnock is invested with the stole and dalmatic by his pastor,
Rev. Patrick L. Albert, of Ascension Parish, Forest City.

"What a blessing this day is for all of us and particularly for those of you who are a part of Ascension Parish," Bishop Bambera said in his homily. "Born from this very community of faith - by the grace and power of God - our brother Seth Wasnock will be ordained a deacon. His life will be changed forever through his acceptance of this ministry from the Lord Jesus. And our lives will be enriched though his service of the Gospel."

The Bishop offered gratitude - first to Almighty God - for the particular call to the diaconate that he planted in the heart of our brother Seth, "as well to all who gather in this beautiful parish church today who have helped Seth discern and respond to God's call."

"By your willingness to embrace your baptismal calling, you have given him a powerful example of lives filled with faith and virtue. I thank those who have been particularly involved in his formation - priests and deacons from the Diocese of Scranton and those who provided for him in his seminary experience. I thank Seth's pastor, Father (Patrick) Albert, as well as his family and friends. And Pam (Seth's mother), I especially thank you for your commitment, your example, your support and the gift of your son to the Church."

Addressing the candidate, Bishop Bambera reminded him that "If you want your ministry as a deacon to be fruitful, you must remain in the Lord's love by faith and hope. Make no mistake about it Seth, the Spirit of God will work in and through you in spite of your own human frailties and in ways far beyond your imagining. Yet that guarantee itself demands that you give yourself - whole and entire - to the ministry entrusted to you this day - not only by working hard - but indeed by leading a life of holiness and intimacy with Christ. So seek to live with integrity a life of celibacy, obedience and simplicity - a life that is marked, molded and characterized by the way of thinking and acting that is proper to Christ."

Noting that God's People are looking for meaning, purpose and peace in their lives, the Bishop told Seth that they would "look to you in your role within the Church to see Jesus. They look to see Jesus in your prayerfulness - in your words - in your hard work - in the simplicity of your life - and in your love. They look to you for so much. In return, they will walk with you and they will support you every step of the way."



One of the many family, friends and parishioners who attended the ordination
greets Rev. Mr. Wasnock after the Mass.

Pictured in front of St. Joseph's Church in Forest City following the ordination Mass are, from left: Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, Vicar General of the Diocese; Reverend Mr. Seth D. Wasnock; Reverend Donald J. Williams, Diocesan Director of Vocations and Seminarians; the Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton; Monsignor David Bohr, Diocesan Secretary for Clergy Formation; and Reverend Patrick L. Albert, pastor of Ascension Parish, Forest City.


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"Here I am Lord" - Dushore parish hosts Religious Vocations Workshop

Young people gathered with clergy and religious for a recent Religious Vocations Workshop hosted by Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Dushore. Coordinated by the parish youth group under the direction of host pastor Father Joseph Hornick and facilitated by Dawn and John Lambert, with support from the Knights of Columbus, the day featured presentations by Father Don Williams, Diocesan director of vocations and seminarians, and Sister Ana Dura, Sisters of the Holy Redeemer, and included prayer, Scripture reading, music activity, group discussions, confessions, adoration and Mass, followed by sharing of a family meal. Pastors and youth from St. Michael in Canton, St. John in Troy, Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Wyalusing and St. Joachim in Meshoppen were also invited to participate.












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Discernment Groups

Each month, young men who are interested in the possibility of becoming priests meet together for a period of quiet prayer, followed by a meal and conversation. Regular gatherings deepen friendship among faith-filled men as they share their real life experiences of seeking God's will in their lives. Very often when men speak of their interest in priesthood, they find encouragement and support by listening to others who also feel that God might be calling them to priestly life. In the discernment group, men discover additional tools for staying attentive to the way in which God speaks to them and for growing in freedom to respond to him.


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